Bob Nickas

 Louise Lawler CS #204  (1990) © Courtesy Louise Lawler and Metro Pictures, New York / SAMMLUNG VERBUND, Wien

Louise Lawler
CS #204 (1990)

© Courtesy Louise Lawler and Metro Pictures, New York / SAMMLUNG VERBUND, Wien

By Bob Nickas

 Cady Noland Publyck Sculpture  (1994) Courtesy Glenstone Museum, Potomac, Maryland (US), Installation view MUSEUM MMK FÜR MODERNE KUNST, Photo: Axel Schneider

Cady Noland
Publyck Sculpture (1994)

Courtesy Glenstone Museum, Potomac, Maryland (US),

Installation view MUSEUM MMK FÜR MODERNE KUNST, Photo: Axel Schneider

By Bob Nickas

Beatriz González at KW Institute for Contemporary Art by Federica Bueti, Henrike Naumann at Galerie im Turm and Irina Rastorgueva & Thomas Martin BQ by Penny Rafferty in Berlin; Cady Noland at MMK by Bob Nickas in Frankfurt; Jörg Immendorf at Haus der Kunst by Daniela Stöppel in Munich; Mary Beth Edelson at Kunsthalle Münster by Alex Scrimgeour

 "The Real Estate Show," 123, Delancey Street, New York City, 31.12.1979 - 21.1.1980

"The Real Estate Show," 123, Delancey Street, New York City, 31.12.1979 - 21.1.1980

Photo: Andrea Messner

The 1980s are a distant mirror of the present: careerism, out-of-control consumerism, greed, and brutality. But the prospect of self-destruction can also create a new sense of community. Bob Nickas on collective resistance in an ambivalent decade. 

Milk, 2014, oil, acrylic ink on canvas
Courtesy of Elisabeth Wingate

In her collages from the beginning of the 1980s, Julia Wachtel made the image-worlds of Pop and trash collide. When she turned to painting, she remained loyal to her technique of hard cuts – which she has maintained ever since. Bob Nickas looks back on the era of infotainment, when picture-making was reinvented.